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How to Use TikTok to Grow Your Influence

Published on: December 5 2022 by Social Media Examiner

How to Use TikTok to Grow Your Influence

How to Use TikTok to Grow Your Influence

- Every social platform
has completely changed to mirror TikTok.
And it's not just because they wanna spend
millions of dollars to change their platform.
No, it's because that is how people are consuming content,
and TikTok is the market leader for not only short video,
but how people want to be entertained today.
(gentle rock music) (birds singing)
- Today, I'm very excited to be joined by Keenya Kelly.
If you don't know who Keenya is, you need to know Keenya.
She's a TikTok Strategist and Consultant
who helps female coaches and course creators
generate more leads and sales with TikTok.
She's host of the Keenya Kelly Podcast,
and her course is called "Monetize the Tok."
Keenya, welcome back to the show.
How you doing today?
- I am doing good.
Excited about all things TikTok again. (laughs)
- I'm super stoked to have you back on the show.
And what we're gonna do today,
Keenya and I are gonna explore
how to grow more influential with TikTok.
So my first question, Keenya,
is there's still a lot of influencers
that are creating content.
Maybe they're podcasters, maybe they're YouTubers,
maybe they're all in on Instagram, or content creators,
but they're not yet on TikTok.
Why should they consider TikTok?
They've been resisting it for some reason.
Tell 'em what's waiting for 'em.
- For sure.
So I know that most people resist TikTok,
or they still think that it's just a goofy platform
where you have to point and dance and all that,
but when I look at TikTok,
it really is magnifying your message a lot faster.
You've got millions and millions of people
who have maybe left Facebook, or spend less time there,
or less time on Instagram,
and they're spending all of this time
on TikTok just scrolling, because one,
it makes them feel good when they're watching these videos.
The algorithm is really, really, really targeting them
with the content that they really like,
so as a creator and a business owner,
if you start putting your content there,
the algorithm is gonna figure out who you are
and start showing it to people that are interested
in a way that no other social media platform
is really doing right now.
- Yeah, and one thing that it doesn't do
that YouTube does do really well
is really pay influencers, right?
So you don't go on there with the hope
that you're gonna grow a big channel,
and then all of a sudden,
you're gonna get a lot of money from TikTok.
You gotta have another reason to go on there.
Is that a fair assessment?
- Yeah, for sure.
I think that the TikTok creator fund type of thing
is very, very, very bad.
They have the ad sets like YouTube, but it's bad.
They have a creator marketplace with brands.
That's really bad.
So the way TikTok pays is awful.
But if you have your own product or service,
or you know how to get with brands,
it's the perfect place for it.
- So let's assume that everybody who's listening to this
is interested in growing a business,
not just creating fame, if you will, right?
So let's assume we're toking to creators, influencers,
and marketers that work for businesses,
and how do they need to be thinking about TikTok?
Through what frame or lens?
You and I toked about some really fascinating stuff
when we were preparing for this,
so I would love you to help the marketers that are listening
understand how they ought to look at TikTok uniquely.
- So when I look at TikTok,
I always call it Super Bowl Sunday.
And when you think about Super Bowl Sunday,
we all get ready for the big game,
and millions of people are sitting
in front of their TVs watching the big game,
but we know Budweiser's getting ready to show up,
and Dorito's getting ready to show up.
Well, you've got millions of people who have decided
that TikTok is their place for entertainment now.
Less on Netflix, less on TV.
And so we as marketers have an opportunity
to present ourselves like this is Super Bowl Sunday
every time we create an ad or a video
on the TikTok platform, because TikTok is going
to target them with our content,
and if we really just look at what is happening...
I always tell people that every social platform
has completely changed to mirror TikTok.
And it's not just because they wanna spend
millions of dollars to change their platform.
No, it's because that is how people are consuming content,
and TikTok is the market leader for not only short video,
but how people want to be entertained today.
- Okay, you're freaking some people out
by saying Super Bowl Sunday, because a lot of people,
when they think of Super Bowl Sunday,
they think of really hilarious ads
that cost millions of dollars to create, right?
So that's not what you're implying.
You don't have to be funny.
Is that correct? - No, no.
- So what is it about the Super Bowl Sunday?
Is it just the entertainment side of it,
or what is it exactly?
Just so I understand that.
- So when I think about it, it is like...
Okay, so with the Super Bowl, not everybody's into football,
but we still watch the game, right?
And so a person logs on to TikTok and says,
"All right, I'm gonna scroll
"and see what's happening on TikTok."
They watch one cat video.
Now it's another cat video.
Now it's a Turkey doing something, right?
And they're there, they're spending all this time
just being entertained there.
And you get this opportunity
where you're looking for the stay-at-home mom
who wants to be a social media manager,
and you can, quote/unquote, target her
with your content that is relatable.
Doesn't mean it has to be funny,
doesn't mean it has to be goofy,
but you're presenting it in a way
that's very short and very quick.
Like Facebook, typically we do these long livestreams,
or a podcast, which is like 30 to 45 minutes,
but you get this really bite-sized opportunity
to speak to that single mom...
Or stay-at-home mom who wants to get into
social media marketing in a creative fashion.
Again, it doesn't mean you have to be goofy.
It's just creative.
- Speaking of creative,
you and I toked a little bit about how this could help
a business be a lot more creative.
tok to me about this a little bit.
- Yeah, so when I think about
a lot of companies and corporations, for the most part,
there is a way that the brand is supposed to behave,
which makes perfect sense, but a lot of times...
Right now, it's kind of boring.
And if people are bored with your message,
guess what they're gonna do?
They're gonna go away from it,
especially as it pertains to social media.
But TikTok is giving a brand an opportunity to be
more of a personality and less of a corporate entity.
And so what I mean by that is,
there's a social media app, I won't mention the name,
but the social media scheduling app that's on TikTok,
and they are killing it, in my opinion.
They are extremely relatable with how people
feel about creating content,
how they feel about scheduling content,
how they feel about their business.
And every single time you watch
one of their videos, it's on brand.
It's not affecting how you see them.
It's making you feel like,
"Ooh, who is this, and why are they doing this?
"Oh, I wanna use them as my social media scheduling app."
So it allows the brand to be less corporate
and more relatable to the field, if that makes sense.
- Yeah, go ahead and mention the name,
'cause people are gonna want to go figure out
who the heck this company is. - Oh, it's "Later." Later.
- Okay, so Later, I think, is a scheduling app
that's similar to some of the other apps,
like Hootsuite and AgoraPulse.
So what are they doing that makes it so relatable?
- Oh my goodness.
Later, their videos are so amazing,
I save them and I recreate them myself.
At this point, I think they probably have
about six or seven different people
creating content for them, and they will take a sound
like from the TV show, "The Office."
I've never seen the show, but they'll take little clips
of something someone has said, and you hear the sound,
you see the person on screen mouthing the words,
but there's different text on screen,
and it's toking about like...
I think Steve Carell, he's like, "No, no, no, God, please,"
but the text on screen is like,
"When you schedule the wrong link,"
"When you send an email to 100,000 people
"with the wrong link."
And everybody can relate to that from a business standpoint,
but it's not outside the bounds of like,
you have to go to HR.
It's just creative and relatable.
- What about generating leads?
Is that even a possibility?
'Cause it seems like everything on TikTok
is so much about just exposure, right?
- Mhm, yeah, so listen, I have someone on my...
That I've trained on TikTok.
I think she gained about 100,000 emails
to her list in the last year and a half.
One lady was able to get 20,000 people
on her email list from one video.
- Wow.
Absolutely, that's cool.
All right, so I think what's holding
a lot of people back from TikTok
is feeling comfortable enough to get on screen, right?
Because one thing it sounds like I'm hearing you say
is that the businesses that are doing this well
are putting a human on the screen, right?
They're either hiring someone who is an influencer,
or they are getting some of their internal employees
to create this content for them, right?
So a lot of us who might have a lot of wisdom might feel,
"No way, I am not going to get on screen."
And we have friends, right?
Well, let's be honest, I'm one of those people, right?
So I'm not there yet, okay?
I'm not there yet.
I probably would be just fine at it, but I'm not there yet.
But there's mutual friends of ours
that have been speakers at Social Media Marketing World
in the past that you have helped onboard into this.
But I think one of the biggest challenges
to getting there is confidence on camera.
So tok to me a little bit about
how we can get more comfortable.
What are your tips? What do you recommend?
- For sure.
So one thing I would say
is that I always like to tell people,
getting in front of a camera,
holding it to your face in front of a light, is not normal.
So it's okay to feel uncomfortable
initially with doing this, right?
And then to post it and put it on an international platform.
So it's okay to feel that way,
but the only way to actually get better is to practike.
When I first got on TikTok in 2020, I was a mess.
The first time I ever did a video on social media,
I was a mess, 'cause I didn't know what I was doing.
But I always tell our clients,
especially our introverted clients, I tell 'em like,
"Okay, why don't we just practike first?"
One, you can practike in the mirror saying something,
but for the most part, I get people to practike
holding their phone up to their face and hitting record.
You're not recording on the TikTok app yet,
but you're just recording into your phone,
and then you watch yourself.
You don't pick yourself apart, but you watch yourself.
But also, I tell people that once you record certain videos,
then send the video to a friend that you love and trust,
and they'll give you some encouragement and feedback,
and make some tweaks according
to what it is that they're saying.
Then what you wanna do is, once you feel comfortable,
sooner than later, you wanna go ahead
and hit "post" on the video.
Now, initially, you're gonna maybe feel a little scared
about what people are gonna say or what's gonna happen,
but most times, what you're gonna find on TikTok
is people are so receptive and so encouraging.
And honestly, they're not really thinking about you.
They're more so thinking about the information
you're conveying in your video.
- Okay, so when we actually pull out our phone,
and we put it in selfie mode, for lack of better words,
and we hit record, what do we...
Give some tips on what we should practike.
Is it the distance from the camera?
I mean, what are we working on when we're practiking?
- For sure.
So one, you're practiking on just recording
very short, bite-sized pieces of content.
Because if you're used to doing any kind of like livestream,
or just toking live in general, like in person,
then you're used to toking in long sentences.
And so you wanna practike recording videos
that are like 30 seconds or less.
Now, obviously, you can do a lot longer on TikTok,
but you wanna get in the habit
of creating short pieces of content.
So I always tell people, before you start recording,
write a little bullet point list.
You can put down, here's your title,
and here's your three things that you wanna
tok about in your partikular video.
And you just wanna practike getting to 30 seconds,
saying your title and giving your three points,
and you practike that.
But then you also practike your confidence,
because initially, you look awkward, you feel awkward,
you're rushing in your words, trying to get it all out.
But once you're practiking, you're like, "Okay."
You become a lot more relaxed in your ability
to deliver the three points you're trying to deliver.
But also, you start working on your angles.
You start realizing that, "Okay, if I look at this video,
"my background's kind of a mess,
"I didn't really think about the lighting in this."
And you start making sure you position yourself
in front of a light or in front of a window,
or things of that nature.
But you also start realizing, "Huh, maybe I should get
"a little $12 tripod from Amazon so I can have free hands."
You start getting real comfortable
as you start doing these little, little things.
- (sighs) Very interesting.
And I would imagine, if you do record a bunch of them,
and you get a couple that you like,
you could end up using those, right?
I mean, you could edit those all together, right?
Have you found, with your clients and stuff,
how many practikes does it take before they feel
comfortable enough to actually publish?
Like, a lot? - Oh, man.
It depends on the client.
If they have a big, bold personality,
I would say maybe three or four videos.
But my introverted clients,
they'll probably take a couple weeks,
but they'll- - Really?
- Like 7 to 10, 15 videos.
Yeah, because you have to be very courageous
to record yourself and then post it to the whole world.
But I really, really encourage our people,
we really are telling them, "Everything's gonna be fine."
We show them people just like them,
and it gives them a little bit more confidence.
- Well, and I would imagine...
I know, just 'cause I've done so much video work,
mostly the longer form stuff,
but I've done so much video work
with professional videographers and stuff,
just remembering what the heck you're gonna say, right?
I mean, do you have any tips on that?
Because some people, you just give 'em a word
and they can flow, but other people are like,
"Nope, I gotta have it scripted."
I mean, what's your thoughts on that?
- So this is one of the reasons why I like recording
in the TikTok app versus in my phone, because if like...
So first, if someone has little notes,
they can write down the title and the three bullet points
on a piece of paper, right?
And they have it in front of them.
And if you're recording in the TikTok app, you can record,
you can say your title, and stop recording.
And then you can hit your first point,
record, and stop recording.
And then you hit your third point and stop recording.
You don't have to edit the video because all you did
was hit record and stop, record and stop.
And that way, you don't have to memorize all three points.
You memorize one, and then you stop.
And then you go to the next one, and then you stop.
- Can you actually record multiple takes and move 'em around
and delete 'em and stuff like that
with the app? - Yes, you can now.
That's a brand new feature, and we are so thankful.
(both laughing)
- What's your take on CapCut?
'Cause I've had a lot of people tell me
they really love using that app.
- So I actually love using it.
We actually hired an editor to start...
I record a bunch of videos,
and I send 'em to her, and she edits them.
And so she like...
What I love about CapCut is the captions,
because what we're learning is that only 20% of people
watch videos with the audio.
I didn't know that.
And so because of that,
you got 80% of folks that are just scrolling,
and if your video has exactly what you're toking about,
people are more likely to unmute.
I looked at my own behavior and I said,
"Huh, I do the exact same thing."
And so using CapCut,
there's a font that everyone uses on CapCut,
which is called the bold font,
and you just have someone
adding little emojis here and there,
different colors in the text,
but it makes our videos look very well.
Now, I will say this.
I have experienced where,
when I'm using CapCut in my captions,
and I upload it to TikTok,
I'm honestly getting less views.
And some people say that that's not their case, but for me,
if I record directly in TikTok app and edit,
then I get more views.
But if I use CapCut, it's just a little less.
- Well, for a beginner, though,
if CapCut allows them to do a lot of cool things
that I guess you cannot do,
is what I'm hearing you say, inside-
- Yes.
- And it's part of the same company, right?
Like ByteDance or whatever, the parent company,
whatever that- (crosstok) - Yes.
- So, okay, cool.
So any other tips on confidence?
And let me just tell you what I heard you say.
First of all, pick up your phone
and start recording some stuff.
While you're recording, work on trying to get
your soundbites down to short little...
Snippets, for lack of better words.
I can't think of a better word.
And then rewatch them and say,
"Okay, did I say that clearly? Let's try that again."
And once you got your message down,
then maybe send it off to somebody for review,
and just say, "Hey, what do you think?
(crosstok) "Did I do a good job on this?"
And then if you wanna start getting a little bit better,
you can refine the location where you're filming it, right?
You work on your lighting, 'cause lighting really matters.
I've seen people that film with the camera above them.
Any thoughts on where you place the camera
when you hit record?
- No. Well, I've experienced-
- Do you normally put in front of your face,
do you understand, or-
- Yeah, so for the most part, I put it in front of my face,
but I've started testing,
"Well, what happens if they can see my full body,
"like I'm sitting down in a studio form?"
And I think that people actually like the full body videos
more than a toking head.
So I personally am making some adjustments.
- How are you doing that?
Are you using some sort of tripod that allows you
to get the right angle on the thing,
and then you just hit record,
or are you actually just holding your arm out to do that?
- No, I have the 18-inch ring light, the newer ring light.
And so it goes up pretty high,
and you can angle down the light
to come forward to you with that light.
- But I'm toking about where the cam...
Does the ring light allow you to put
the camera in the middle of it?
Do you understand what- - Yes.
Oh, it does. Okay. - Yeah, there's a phone holder
in the light.
- And is there some sort of remote control
that allows you to hit record,
or do you have to reach up to do it?
- Yep, you can get a little remote control from Amazon,
and you can hit record that way as well.
- Okay, cool.
- Mhm.
- All right, so folks, give it a shot.
Maybe I'll give it a try.
I don't know, we'll see.
I mean, I'm still resisting, to be honest with you,
but at least we've got some tips
where everybody can work on that confidence.
Now, let's tok about content that enables us
to become more valuable, right?
So assuming we get over the camera confidence,
and we've gotten it down where we feel like...
We feel pretty good about the content
as far as the way it looks, right?
And the way it sounds.
Now we wanna dive into the substance of it, right?
Because if we want to yield more influence,
there's specific kinds of content, presumably,
that is more valuable to customers than others.
So what do we need to know about creating content
that is really valuable for other people?
- For sure.
So, especially as a business owner,
it's really important to understand
that we are the commercial on TikTok.
We're not the entertainment.
So when you are delivering content- (crosstok)
What'd you say?
- I like that, actually.
We're the commercial, not the entertainment.
Elaborate on that a little bit.
- Yeah, so people go to TikTok to escape from their reality.
They're escaping from life.
Instead of watching Netflix, they're saying,
"I'm gonna go to TikTok, it's gonna make me laugh.
"I'm gonna learn an Amazon hack, food hack, whatever."
And so they're coming there for that,
and we, the business people, we're trying to get them
to opt into our email list.
We're trying to sell them our products.
And so they're there to watch the TV show, quote/unquote,
"This is Us," and we're the commercial
during the commercial break.
And so it's just important to realize that we're not...
They're not there for us, they're there to be entertained.
- Okay, I got an important clarifying question, because...
We can still provide a lot of value though, right?
- Yes. - Because we're gonna
tok about how to actually turn them into customers next,
but how can we, knowing full well
that they're maybe there to be entertained,
and we might interrupt their normal flow,
we still wanna provide something that's super valuable,
if it's not entertaining, correct?
So how do we go about doing that?
- Yeah, so you can do that in multiple different ways.
One, you can be a toking head,
you can just teach a concept.
So sometimes I will teach about overcoming a life challenge,
and how to overcome a life challenge.
Other times, I will teach about how to make money
or how to get a brand deal.
But other times, I would just tok about...
I would just encourage them.
"I know you're dealing with this, this, and this,"
and I'll just do some type of encouragement
that just gives them a little break
from whatever it was that they're scrolling.
But for the most part, as a business teacher on TikTok,
I'm literally just saying, "Hey, if you want to be able
"to generate more leads for your business,
"here's these top three things you wanna do."
And I make my stuff very quick, very simple,
but I also will have sometimes some movement,
sometimes I'll use the fun trends on TikTok
to convey that same message, and things like that.
- Huh, okay.
So can you give us an example, a couple of examples,
of how you actually would go about doing this?
Just 'cause we've spent so much time
toking through examples, and I think it'd be really useful.
Just pick something that...
I don't know, how to get an influencer deal,
or whatever comes to your mind.
- For sure.
- Since it's only 30 seconds long,
maybe you could just make up a couple on the fly.
I know I'm putting you to the test,
but I would imagine you know how to do this, right?
- For sure. - Just so people
can understand how this might sound.
- Yeah, so a commercial that I...
Quote/unquote, a video that I would do, I would say,
"Three tips to get your first brand deal,"
and that's how I would start it off.
And then I would say, "Number one, you wanna start
"creating content around the brand
"that you want to acquire."
Like for example, I love Teachable, and I would say,
"I love Teachable, I love creating a course."
And so you can create a video toking about Teachable,
and that make sure you tag them.
Number two, once you've tagged them,
go ahead and take the video and go to their Instagram DM
and send them the video, tell them who you are,
and you would love to collaborate with them.
And then number three, once they reach out,
now you can have a conversation with them
to determine about working together.
Don't immediately tell them how much money
you wanna make for collaboration, but ask them,
what is it that they want to...
What are their goals for this quarter,
and see how you guys can collaborate.
Doing that with the brand makes them see you,
makes them want to use the content you've already created,
but now they either have to pay you or get your permission.
- Okay, so that seemed like that was more than 30 seconds.
Is that okay? - (laughs) Yes, it is.
- It's the goal to get to 30 seconds,
or what's your thought?
By the way, great job on that.
- Thanks. (laughs)
Yeah, my goal is to do videos that are 25 seconds or less,
but usually I have practiked it so that...
That one was more on the fly, but normally,
mine are like 30 seconds or less.
20 seconds, mostly.
- Got it.
So the intent behind this is really to provide enough...
Is to fulfill the promise of what you said
in the first few seconds, right?
So this is really interesting
that you start with an actual headline.
So you don't start with a question.
Your headline was, "How to get more..."
What was it again? I forget what you came up with.
- "How to get more brand deals."
- "How to get more brand deals."
Could you, just free flowing with you a little bit,
say, "Wondering how to get more brand deals?"
- Yes, I do that too.
- And then, "here's how,"
something along those lines? - Yes.
- Okay. - 'Cause what it is,
that's your opening hook,
because when you get on TikTok,
you've got one to two seconds
before they scroll away from you,
'cause they came for whatever they wanted, and here you are.
So that first opening line is everything.
The opening line, your energy,
your background, your lighting,
all of that, that is the moment right there.
That's why I call it Super Bowl Sunday.
When they scroll, it's on.
- And I would imagine, if you said,
"Wondering how to get more influencer deals?
"Here's how," you could...
If you forgot to say, "Here's three tips,"
you could put the words, "three tips,"
right up there on the screen, right?
To keep 'em- - Yes.
- And you can use the text on the screen
to supplement what you're saying.
Is that something you recommend?
- Yes, and that's also why, when you use the app like CapCut
with the font, the bold font,
that font sometimes, if the editor is really good,
something will flash on the screen.
So it's not just you and what you said and that text,
but it could be an emoji or whatever
that they put on the screen with it.
- Fascinating.
So how do we actually come up with this kind of content?
Do you have any tips on how to ideate a list of topics
that we ought to consider making videos on?
- Yeah, so first of all, before I start coming up with like,
"What am I gonna say in my videos,"
I'm always asking myself, "What is my goal?"
The month of September, is our goal to grow our email list?
Is it to sell a course, or what is the goal?
And once we know what that goal is, then we go,
"Okay, we know who our target audience is,"
they always stay the same, but then we ask ourselves,
"What are the problems that they're dealing with?
"What are they asking?
"What are they saying in the marketplace?"
And so first thing I do is I go to my comment section,
and I look at, what are the questions
they're already asking me that I can create content around?
Also, I'll go to the platform,
and I'll look at some of my competitors
and see the kind of content that they're creating.
But mostly, I go in their comment section,
I see, what are people asking?
Because you want create a piece of content
that people want the answer to.
But then also, I'll go to the site,
AnswerThePublic.com, and that site will tell you,
"Hey, here's all the questions that people are asking."
And once you know what those questions are,
then you can do a little bullet point.
So we're toking about brand deals.
Instead of toking about all the details of a brand deal,
I can tok about, "Here's what UGC is,
"here's what user generated content is."
And that's one piece.
Second thing I could say, "How I made $9,000 from one video
"without posting it on TikTok."
That's another thing.
And it's just going through, "What are they asking,
"what are they dealing with,"
and then coming up with the solution in your videos.
- Well, and if you already create content,
which many of you do, some of you are bloggers,
podcasters, YouTubers, you have a plethora
of content that you've created, long form content,
and you could just break that one YouTube video
probably into 10 different TikToks,
depending on what the-
- Oh, yes. (crosstok) - Is inside of it, right?
- Mhm, absolutely.
Most people on YouTube,
their videos are at least 10 minutes long,
and there's so much...
I mean, even if they chop it up
or they just rerecord content from the video,
you've got 15-second videos like nobody's business
in a YouTube video.
- Now, how do you create...
How do you record it in such a way
that your audience can relate to it?
Because it's one thing to just spill wisdom
or knowledge or insights, but how do we record it
in such a way that maybe they draw affinity to us, right?
Because we want to get them, ultimately,
to want to consume more of our content.
Do you have any tips on that,
on how to become more relatable to the audience?
- So one of the most popular things on TikTok is the trends.
Now, you don't have to use trends,
but that's one of the most popular things on the platform.
And it's basically where there is some sound
that someone has brought to TikTok.
It's normally, they've either said it,
or they pull it from a movie or a song or something.
And you think through a scenario with that sound,
"How can I use that sound for..." Whatever.
So I'll give you an example.
There was a sound on TikTok last year of this guy crying,
and he goes and he falls or something.
You can hear the person crying, and they fall.
And so I said, "Okay, how can I make that
"relatable to my audience?"
So I did a funny little video, and I said,
"When I sent an email to 20,000 people,
"and I forgot to put the link to my product."
And you see me running into the living room,
I fall on the couch, and I fall on the floor.
And the video goes viral, and the comment section is,
everybody can relate to that if you are an email marketer,
because we've all done it, and we're like, "Oh, god."
But it's very relatable. - Okay, I have to ask
this question.
How did you feel filming the running in
and falling on the couch?
Probably like an idiot, right?
- Yes, and I toked to myself and I said,
"Keenya, you've got one shot."
'Cause you're 40 years old.
Like, you've got one shot.
But also, what I did was- (crosstok)
- Yourself in the process, right?
- Oh, yeah.
But I also have a 14-year-old cat, and he always...
People love watching him in a video,
if I can get him in a video.
So he just happened to be on the couch at that moment,
and I said, "Okay, you've got one shot
"with this cat and with your body."
And so I fell over, and the cat just jumped
and was just like, "What's going on?"
And so it goes viral 'cause it's relatable, and the cat,
and I'm rolling on the floor.
But I felt so dumb. (laughs)
- I mean, I get it completely.
All right, so what I'm hearing you say is that,
first of all, the obvious thing to do,
if you are already providing content
to your audience on other platforms,
is to tap that and figure out a way to teach that.
And it sounds like a three structure thing,
like one, two, three seems to be
what a lot of people are doing,
or at least what you do and advise, like,
"Here's three tips. First one, second one, third one."
And you reveal them along the way
instead of all at once, right?
- So I do that sometimes.
Sometimes my video is just the one tip.
So sometimes it's five, sometimes it's seven,
sometimes it's just... I'm just toking.
- Got it. Okay.
Perfect, so now that we have a sense of what kind of content
we ought to consider creating that will allow us
to yield more influence,
the logical thing that a lot of people
are asking right now is, "How do I actually take
"some of these viewers and turn them into customers?"
So what are your thoughts on generating more leads,
generating more sales using TikTok?
- Yeah, so the number one thing I tell everybody to do,
before you start creating on TikTok,
make sure you have your funnel created.
Because you don't know which video
that you put on the platform that's gonna make you go viral.
Because it's not if you're gonna go viral on TikTok,
it's when you're gonna go viral.
And so I tell people,
"Make sure you have your backend set up,"
meaning that you have that free offer, that upgrade,
and then that email, it upgrades to a paid offer,
and you have like a Linktree type of thing.
One, the free thing they can opt into.
Next thing is the smaller offer, and then a larger offer.
And we make sure we have that link in the TikTok bio
before we start doing content.
Then in your bio, the written bio, I make sure I say,
"This is who I am, who I serve," and then I tell them,
"Click the link here for this free..." Whatever.
And that's how we get a lot of opt-ins
to our free offer on TikTok.
But in all of our videos,
I'm either saying a call to action,
there's either a call to action written on screen,
or I go into the comment section,
and I say it in the comments,
and then I pin that comment to the top, so that way,
no matter when they've watched that video,
they're being told to do something somewhere.
- I wanna explore some of this.
First of all, this is really, really fascinating.
First, let's go back to the bio.
How much space, how many characters,
off the top of your head? You may not know the exact answer,
but are we toking about just a few words?
Are we toking like a Tweet?
I mean, how much room do we have to say,
"This is who I am, and this is who I serve"?
- I think it's 80 to 100 characters.
- Okay, do you ever put emojis in there,
or do you recommend just saying one thing or...
'Cause you think about what people do in their Twitter bio,
they try to do all sorts of things, right?
- Yeah.
- What's your thoughts?
In your case, would you just say,
"I serve female coaches and course creators.
"Get my free PDF," I mean, something as simple as that?
- That's exactly what I do.
My bio just says, "I help female coaches
"generate leads on TikTok,"
and then the emojis I have are two arrows,
and it's an arrow on the left and one on the right,
and in the middle, it says, "free training below."
- And does that go to a Linktree?
- Yep, mhm.
- And it's usually the top thing,
I would imagine, inside the link tree.
- Yep, it's the free thing,
and then there's a small offer after that.
- So did...
This sounds very simple,
but a lot of people don't necessarily have a freebie.
I would imagine a lot of the people you're working with
haven't really gotten to that point.
'Cause if you're a long form content creator,
you have plenty of time to go ahead
and establish your value proposition
and directly sell whatever it is you're going to sell.
But we're toking about a short form piece of content here
where you've got seconds, right?
And so what are your thoughts on creating a really simple
and useful resource that someone might wanna opt into?
Have you struggled with this, or others,
customers, clients, so on and so forth?
- Yeah, so I definitely struggled
when I first became a content creator in general years ago.
But someone gave me a really valuable piece of advice.
They said, "Why don't you just ask them what they want?"
And I was like, "Well, I'm supposed to know, right?"
And they're like, "No, you won't know unless you ask them."
And so I've gotten to this habit of,
I post on my personal Facebook page, and I'll just say...
I remember when I first got on TikTok and I was teaching,
and I said, "If you're not using TikTok
"right now for your business, why not?
"What would help you to use TikTok?"
And then I said, "I'm just doing research,
"just give me your feedback."
And I would get hundreds of responses, and it told me,
"Hey, they need the basics of getting started on TikTok."
And so from there is where I created a PDF
and a video training to go along with it.
But some of my clients, like one of 'em,
she's a nutritionist, and I said,
"Well, what's the number one thing that people wanna know?"
They're like, "How do we go from eating the way we eat today
"to being vegan or to being vegetarian?"
And so she created the perfect solution to their problem,
and it's a PDF, or the training, or what have you.
And then she upsells them into
her more higher tiket item afterwards.
But it's really about toking to your audience,
and if you don't really have one, you can do a search,
and you can look at your competitors
and look at their comment section.
I'm not saying repeat their freebie,
but you can look and see, what are people struggling with?
You can go on a Facebook group.
I think Pat Flynn said this years ago.
You can go on a Facebook group, to certain groups,
and you can do a search, a keyword search,
and it's gonna show you all the questions
people are asking about whatever it is.
Like, today I was in this Christian Facebook group,
dating group, and everybody had the same question.
"Is it okay for a woman to ask a man for his phone number?
"How do men feel about it?"
And so if somebody wanted to know,
they could create something for those women,
'cause that was the number one question in that group.
I don't have that question, but you know...
(both laughing)
- Well, what's the answer, Keenya?
Of course.
- If I want someone's number, I'm gonna ask.
(both laughing) "What's up?"
- So, okay, this is really interesting, because...
What I don't know about TikTok is,
how easy is it for someone to type in their email address...
When you're using something like Linktree,
and then it takes you...
I'm not, obviously, the guy on my team doing all this stuff,
but is it really...
Generally speaking, do people prefer to put in
a phone number or a email address?
What do you find is more valuable?
Does it depend on the age of the audience?
What's your thoughts on this?
- I definitely think it depends on the age of the audience.
I'm 41, and so I'm used to doing
a lot of email marketing.
I'm not used to getting a lot of text messages,
but I've notiked that the younger generation
is okay with getting texts.
And so for me, my opt-in is always
your name and your email address.
But we've started collecting phone numbers,
and people seem to really, really like that.
So I really think it's about what a person
can manage themselves or with their team.
If their team knows SMS messaging, then go that route,
and if they know email, then go that route.
- Okay, so we've toked about the bio,
we've toked about how it should say who you serve,
and in your case, you have little arrow emojis
pointing down to the call to action,
which probably has its own title, right?
How long can you do the call to action?
Is it just a couple of characters, or what does it say?
Is it just a preselected button, or can that be more text
that says like, "download free PDF"?
Do you understand what I'm asking, in the bio?
- Yeah, no it's still within that same 100, 80 characters.
So it's like, when I say,
"I help female my course creators,"
I literally have 80 characters for that,
and "grab the link below."
All of that is the same 100, 80 total.
- And you only get one link in the bio,
is that correct? - Yes, one. Mhm.
- Okay, so let's now focus on the actual call to action
that you use inside your videos.
Are there some kinds of videos that you create
that have no call to action,
that are just designed to draw an audience to you
and get them to hopefully follow you,
and there are other types of videos where you specifically
want them to take the next action?
- Absolutely. I am very, very strategic.
So I understand that I'm the commercial on TikTok,
and I'm not the main course.
And so I'm like, "Well, how do I get attention to me?"
So the video I did when I fell on the floor,
that was more so an attention one.
"Let me get you to see that I exist
"by me doing this really dumb thing
"that could have hurt my knees," right?
And so I do that video, but immediately after that video,
I post an actual teaching video
that has a call to action in it.
So it's both of those video get posted
within the same hour, or what have you.
And I know that me falling on the floor
is gonna do way better than the other one,
but I make sure that that video
is followed up with a business video,
because I know that when people start watching that video,
if they liked me enough or are curious enough,
they're gonna click to go to my profile,
and the next video they're gonna see
is that video of me teaching, and they go,
"Oh, she can help me make more money,
"she can help me grow my email list."
And then they see my bio.
It says, "free thing, grab here."
So I do that at least once a week, of something that is,
quote/unquote, off brand that's funny and relatable,
because I know it'll get me more attention,
'cause it's entertainment,
but I strategically get people
opting into our product services.
- Even the entertaining videos,
do you recommend putting some words over the top that says,
"Want more? Follow me," or something,
just so that you don't have to actually waste any words?
'Cause obviously I know with some of these ones
that go viral, the hope is that people loop it
and watch it over and over again, right?
And you don't wanna disrupt the entertainment flow...
Or maybe even pinning it in the comments that you mentioned,
do you have some sort of call to action like,
"Follow me for more of this," in all of your videos,
or do you only focus on the call to action
on the videos that are teaching videos?
- I do them both.
I don't always do that, but I will say the one
that I had when I fell over, it was like,
I had the words on top saying
that I sent the email to 20,000 people,
and then in small letters, not too small,
but small letters on the right side of the screen, I said,
"Follow for more," or "Click the link on my bio."
I'll say that sometimes in some of the videos.
But if I know a video has real viral potential,
I will also then put something in the comments saying,
"Hey, wanna join our three-day challenge,"
or whatever, and I'll pin it.
And I know it may not go viral immediately, but I'm like,
"This video has potential, and it'll go at some point."
- And I assume the comments do not contain links,
or if they do, they don't-
- No. - They're not hot clickable.
Right? So- - Nope, not right now.
- Okay, so the call to action on the videos
where you're intentionally actually
trying to get them to take an action
after you've given them some wisdom, some insights and tips,
do you find the ones where you tell them
with your voice to do it outperform the ones
where you just put the words on the screen,
and maybe something in the comments,
or do you always say it?
I'm just curious.
Do you always say something at the end?
Do you save a little room to say,
"and there's so much more where that came from.
"Get my free resource," or something like that?
- Mhm, so what used to happen
is I would say it more than anything,
and I would get a lot of traction,
but I'm notiking that TikTok has become very sensitive
to us saying, "Grab the link," "Go to my profile,"
or even writing it. - Oh, okay.
- Yeah, so what I have started doing
is I've been testing when I say it versus when it's written,
and it's doing a lot better when it's written,
but I never say, "Click the link in my bio."
I will say, "Visit my profile."
- Is it because you feel like the algorithm
is punishing people that say that?
- Yes, 'cause I kept hearing about that last year,
and I was like, "I'm not experiencing it,"
and then I started testing it and I'm like, "Oh."
"Oh, this video is not getting much traction."
But once I stopped saying "Click the link," or bio,
or whatever, then I started having some success again.
- But putting it on the video, overlaying it on the video,
seems to be less of an issue
as long as you don't say those words?
Can you type those words?
Do you understand what I'm asking?
- So if you type the words,
if you say, "Click the link in bio" on text,
they're picking that up too.
So that's why it'll say, "Visit my page."
- Ah, okay. Wow.
So you gotta get really creative with it, huh?
- Yes.
- What about when you pin comments?
Less of an issue with that?
- So if I say, "Click the link in my bio" in the comments,
I'll get an alert that will say, "You can't post that."
I'm like...
- Oh, wow, okay.
So it's getting harder, isn't it?
- Oh, yes.
- Fascinating.
So it sounds like eventually, I can see a day
where you're gonna have to figure out a way
to just hopefully create great content
so people want more of it so that they'll go to your bio
and ultimately check out who you are, right?
- Yeah, 'cause that's what happens
with most times on TikTok.
People are very highly engaged with content,
so that's why I'm like,
I don't have to always tell them what to do.
They'll go to my profile.
But for me, I use TikTok live for lead generation
more than I do the actual content now, because I'm like,
"They're not as sensitive on livestream."
'Cause on livestream, you can say it,
you can have a link there,
you can have a green screen image up
toking about whatever it is you have back there.
You can do a lot on livestreams
that you can't do on the regular feed.
- But it's gone when it's done, right?
I mean, that's the whole point.
- Yes. - Okay, so let's tok about...
You were telling me there's a cool feature
that you're excited about that recently...
And of course, this is all relative,
depending on when you're listening to this podcast.
But what is that feature that you're excited about
that TikTok is rolling out?
- It is TikTok direct messaging.
Listen, I've been telling everybody about this.
I'm watching what has been happening,
because it used to be...
Well, I remember back when...
2020, when I joined, anybody could send you a DM.
And I went super viral, and I told people,
"DM me for more information."
I had probably 1,000, 2,000 DMs.
I freaked out.
I didn't know what was happening.
And they all started DMing me Instagram too.
So then I closed my DM, 'cause I didn't understand,
and then TikTok made it to where only
if you follow somebody and they follow you back,
that's the only way you can send direct messages.
Well, a couple months ago, we got an alert where it says...
Like, your notification,
and you can see the words, "message request."
And we all know what that means.
That means that people are gonna be able
to send you messages, and you can decide
if you wanna see the message or not.
And so I've been telling people since that popped up
that TikTok is getting ready to open the message feature,
and just three weeks ago, I got a message from a girl
who said, "Hey, I heard about your challenge.
"I wanna join. What's the link?"
And I gave her the link, but then I looked and said,
"She doesn't follow me, I don't follow her."
And it clicked that that feature is opening up now.
- Got it. So what I'm hearing you saying, it was opened,
and then they closed it, and now it's coming back.
Is that what I'm-
- Yes, mhm. - Hearing you say?
And you can for sure include links in there,
and they're hot clickable? - Yes, mhm.
- Okay, very exciting.
Do you think they're gonna ultimately start integrating
with these automation tools like Minichat and chatbot,
and these chatbots and stuff like that?
Do you see that coming next?
- Yeah, I do.
And I was actually toking to Minichat about that,
'cause they've been waiting on it and asking for it.
And I mean, it's a huge way to keep people
on the TikTok platform through direct messaging,
'cause right now, you can't tok back and forth.
All you can do is comment.
But I think that's all that's coming.
- Fascinating.
All right, Keenya.
Now I've got a call to action for you, which is,
where can people find out more about you, Keenya?
Let's start with, how can they find you on TikTok,
and then where else do you wanna send them
if they wanna discover more about you?
- Yeah, so I am literally, everything, "Keenya Kelly."
K-E-E-N-Y-A K-E-L-L-Y.
That on TikTok, that on Instagram,
and Keenya Kelly on my website.
- Okay, perfect.
So Keenya Kelly, first of all,
thank you for answering my 10,000 questions.
(Keenya laughing)
It's my hope that someone who's listening says,
"All right, Keenya really made it simple,
"and I'm gonna go ahead and do this."
So what I encourage you to do is,
if you've listened to this show and you feel...
Like, you give it a shot, I want you to message Keenya-
- Please. - On your favorite platform,
and let her know that you heard her
here on the Social Media Marketing Podcast,
and you gave it a shot,
'cause Keenya would love to hear from you.
Keenya, thank you so much for sharing
your thoughts with us today.
We're really so much better because of it.
- Yay! Thanks for having me. I appreciate it.